Daily Verse – Nothing Returns Empty.

so is my word that goes out from my mouth: It will not return to me empty, but will accomplish what I desire and achieve the purpose for which I sent it.

Isaiah 55:11 NIVUK

The word of the Lord never returns empty.

I’ve always thought of this verse and the return of the doves to Noah’s Ark in the same way. The doves returned with the olive branch indicating that the flood was receding and dry land was present again.

Likewise God’s words return with a sign of something better or changed.

God’s word always impacts us and others.

Isaiah speaks out loud God’s message – God’s word will not return empty – rê·qām – in vain, without cause, or void.

It will accomplish – tsalach – cause, effect, be profitable, be good – what God pleases and it will accomplish – asah – advance or become – the purpose for which He sent it.

Our words go out, but do we think about how they might return?

It is obvious from many sources that many people don’t think about what they say, or only focus on what it achieves for themselves.

We should always be careful and considered in what we say – a lesson I am often reminded I need to still learn!

Creatively, it is similar. We should consider what our creative output says to others and expect a return sign.

Words and actions.

Nothing returns empty.

Daily Verse – 1 Peter 4:10

https://my.bible.com/en-GB/bible/113/1PE.4.10.NIVUK

Interestingly in the Greek Interlinear text of this passage, the phrase ‘from his great variety of spiritual gifts’ does not appear. This is clearly an addition by the translators to further inform on the meaning of the passage.

The more straight forward Interlinear ‘(as) each has received a gift’ is much more inclusive than the addition of spiritual gifts.

You can read of specific spiritual gifts in 1 Corinthians 13, and no doubt your ‘gift’ may be part or inclusive of these.

Yet there is a difference.

Your gift maybe of conversation or hospitality, music or poetry, confidence or encouragement, teaching or listening, art or craft.

God’s Spirit will be abundantly clear in all of these, no doubt, and they are your gifts to use in service of others, reflecting God’s ‘manifold grace’.

The word gift is charisma occurs 8 times in the N.T. and is always translated as gift, ‘free from God’ and only once in Romans 8:1 as ‘spiritual gift’.

You all have at least one gift from God, which brings something positive to others.

What’s yours?

Daily Verse – Colossians 4:6

Colossians 4:6 https://my.bible.com/bible/113/COL.4.6

The Apostle Paul is talking again about proclaiming the mystery of Christ.

He exhorts us to talk about Jesus, the hope of our lives, wherever and whenever the opportunity presents itself. As in yesterday’s verse, we are to always be ready to share our faith, even in the face of opposition.

Today, Paul asks us to have grace in our conversations.

The Greek word is charis and it occurs 24 times in the New Testament and is mostly translated as grace and favour, from God and from ourselves as a result of God in our lives.

Strong tells us that charis is from chairo meaning: of manner or act (abstract or concrete; literal, figurative or spiritual; especially the divine influence upon the heart, and its reflection in the life; including gratitude).

Our conversations are to have God upon our hearts and be a reflection of Him in our lives.

The Daily Verse – Psalm 5:3

‘In the morning, Lord , you hear my voice; in the morning I lay my requests before you and wait expectantly. ‘ – NIVUK

Psalms 5:3

What’s the first thing you do when you wake up?

Does Prayer or reading the Bible feature in your morning routine?

King David may be referring here to private prayer, a spoken formal prayer, or even the morning sacrifice in the Temple.

But he emphasises the timing – in the morning – twice in the same sentence.

The start of the day and the Lord is being reminded that David is already starting the dialogue – you hear my voice.

It is also an affirmation that God is listening.

David lays his requests before God.

There is no further definition of what those requests are.

There is no judgement posed by defining the specifics of what he requests – neither should you judge yourself on what you pray for.

Then David waits expectantly.

He knows the reply will come.

Morning routine is a hot topic.

I’m sure if you run a web/video/podcast search, it will result in more to read/watch/ listen to than you will have mornings in your life time to occupy.

There is an abundance of top executives, leaders, sports people, and creatives, who all swear by their morning routines as a pathway to their success.

King David already had it locked-down all the way back in the Psalms.

Our morning routines will probably fall somewhere in between the two following happenings: early, organised/compartmentalised, drinking water, eating breakfast, perhaps exercise, maybe meditation; or, hitting the snooze button, oversleeping, rushing around, drinking anything as long as it has the maximum amount of caffeine in it, with promises of breakfast as you run out of the house.

King David’s morning routine is simple.

He wakes up and he talks to God.

How do you think your life would be different if the first person you spoke to when you awoke was God?

Make your requests.

Tell God what you hope the day will bring. Share your worries and concerns. Remember others.

The Bible app YouVersion allows you to set up a ‘verse of the day’ message to come through to your mobile at a specific time. So, alarm sounds, you grab your phone, switch it off, a verse from the Bible is there waiting for you.

Talk to God. Listen to his Word as you make your morning coffee/tea. Pray.

Try it even for a week and see what a difference it makes.