Daily Verse – Matthew 6:6

You Version

This is one of the most quoted passages of Jesus talking about prayer and he highlights the difference between praying in public for the praise of others and praying individually in a close relationship with God.

The Greek Interlinear offers up an interesting translation of part of this passage.

Rather than ‘go into your room’ it reads, eiselthe eis to tameion sou – enter into the room of you.

Tamieon – the word here used for room – has only two occurrences in the N.T. – here and Luke 12:24. In the latter it is translated as ‘storeroom’.

Strong’s informs us that tampon generally refers to the ground floor or an interior room or chamber of an eastern house.

But the final part of the phrase is the room (tamieon) of you (sou) – not ‘your’ indicating is a space of yours.

The inner room of you.

Sou occurs 478 times in the N.T. and is predominantly translated as ‘of you’ and lesser just ‘you’.

My mastery of N.T. Greek is at best simple, and the next part of the verse has the word ‘door’ – thura – used 14 times as door, but it can be in a literal or figurative state.

Whether you physically shut yourself in a room or pray from the inner you, Jesus assures us that God listens.

So pray.

Daily Verse – Colossians 4:6

Colossians 4:6 https://my.bible.com/bible/113/COL.4.6

The Apostle Paul is talking again about proclaiming the mystery of Christ.

He exhorts us to talk about Jesus, the hope of our lives, wherever and whenever the opportunity presents itself. As in yesterday’s verse, we are to always be ready to share our faith, even in the face of opposition.

Today, Paul asks us to have grace in our conversations.

The Greek word is charis and it occurs 24 times in the New Testament and is mostly translated as grace and favour, from God and from ourselves as a result of God in our lives.

Strong tells us that charis is from chairo meaning: of manner or act (abstract or concrete; literal, figurative or spiritual; especially the divine influence upon the heart, and its reflection in the life; including gratitude).

Our conversations are to have God upon our hearts and be a reflection of Him in our lives.

I’ve Been Kondo’d!

Studying martial arts from a young age taught me not underestimate the small person – for most of the time I was that small person. 

Lifestyle, tidying, de-cluttering guru, Marie Kondo is definitely one of those opponents you should be wary of. I was gentlemanly and didn’t look up her personal information but from watching just one of her tv episodes she seems tiny!

I will confess that I had read one of her books before – and that I acted upon none of it.

I read and understood the principles, I could visualise the end result, but the anxiety of being in the process left everything the way it was with just the occasional ‘putting away’ more effectively of too much stuff.

Switching study’s with my wife brought me back around to tackling clothes and other paraphernalia which needed sifting. 

Surprisingly, after the main furniture move between the two rooms, I was taking a break and looking for something to mindlessly watch for half an hour with a cup of coffee, and a well known online tv supplier highlighted Kondo’s tv series to me.

I watched. The methods detailed in her book were refreshed in my mind. I was convinced sufficiently this time to give it a go.

What did I have to lose, I already had more stuff out of the wardrobe than in it now, so I couldn’t close the doors and pretend everything was fine.

I’m not sure that I selected clothes on whether they gave me joy – except all of my rugby jerseys, of course! – but I was far more realistic, or ruthless, in getting rid of items I really hadn’t worn for a good length of time.

Then came the folding!

If it was a competition I wouldn’t have won on either speed or consistency, but the satisfaction of being able to see all of my clothes and, therefore, not just pulling out what ever was on the top was greater than I expected. Shirts on hangers, suits and dress coats in one half of the wardrobe, general outdoor jackets and gillets on the other side. I even had space left to put hats, scarves, and gloves inside, instead of in another storage unit.

Books I had already sorted, but there are items I will thin out further, just from glancing across the shelves.

Pens, pencils, cables, notebooks, paperwork, all sifted and thinned.

The numerous ‘miscellaneous’ drawers and boxes quickly became the throwaway/recycle drawers and boxes.

The final result?

The admission that I should have done all of this when I read Marie Kondo’s book to begin with!

Once the trauma of dealing with everything you have drawn into your home has been overcome, the product of less but more effective ‘stuff’ in your life is like a weight being lifted.

Once you engage with the process the ease with which you can maintain the system makes you wonder why you didn’t do this years ago.

One of the biggest lessons is the realisation that you are actually creating a system which then needs maintaining. 

It’s a flow-system like any other.

Maintain the system and enjoy the flow.

It has been a couple of months now but all is ‘flow’ still.

Plus, I am discovering the mindset is seeping in to other areas of my life.

My phone now has less apps – a lot less. I am even looking at it less. Use, as well as functionality, is a key driver now.

If there was a sticker out there declaring ‘I’ve been Kondo’d’ I would gladly display it!

What Would You Do With 47% Extra Time?

A study, led by Harvard, claims that an average ‘knowledge’ worker works in a state of distraction for 47% of their time.

Flip this around.

By being more focused they could accomplish the same amount of work in half the time.

Or potentially double their output.

Just because we are ‘creatives’ it doesn’t mean we don’t get distracted, or it doesn’t matter if we are distracted.

So how effectively can you focus?

Remember that multi-tasking is a myth – your brain focuses on each task by rapid switching, so you only ever do one task at a time.

Phone messages. Phone calls. Social Media. Changing the tunes. Not being clear on the task you will execute in a defined period of time. Not being prepared with everything you need for that task.

Any improvement in your habits or discipline, which impact that 47%, will result in a significant improvement.

Professional cycling team Ineos – formally Team Sky – are as famous for their 1% rule as they are their Tour de France victories.

Try and improve everything you do by 1%.

Over time those 1%s add up to something incredible.

  • Prepare properly – have everything you need where you need it.
  • Schedule specific tasks in your calendar and put a time limit on it.
  • Use a timer to keep you on track.
  • Limit the amount of time you need to switch away from your task – if you are hinting for 90mins don’t have a playlist which only lasts 55mins, for example.

You can Log/Record what you do in the time you devote to your creative endeavours, to see how personally bad the problem is for you. Every time you stop doing your intended task make a quick written or voice note.

Review it and do what you can to delete those clear distractions. See how much of that 47% you can gain back.

(The distraction of keeping the log doesn’t count!).

The Daily Verse – Psalm 5:3

‘In the morning, Lord , you hear my voice; in the morning I lay my requests before you and wait expectantly. ‘ – NIVUK

Psalms 5:3

What’s the first thing you do when you wake up?

Does Prayer or reading the Bible feature in your morning routine?

King David may be referring here to private prayer, a spoken formal prayer, or even the morning sacrifice in the Temple.

But he emphasises the timing – in the morning – twice in the same sentence.

The start of the day and the Lord is being reminded that David is already starting the dialogue – you hear my voice.

It is also an affirmation that God is listening.

David lays his requests before God.

There is no further definition of what those requests are.

There is no judgement posed by defining the specifics of what he requests – neither should you judge yourself on what you pray for.

Then David waits expectantly.

He knows the reply will come.

Morning routine is a hot topic.

I’m sure if you run a web/video/podcast search, it will result in more to read/watch/ listen to than you will have mornings in your life time to occupy.

There is an abundance of top executives, leaders, sports people, and creatives, who all swear by their morning routines as a pathway to their success.

King David already had it locked-down all the way back in the Psalms.

Our morning routines will probably fall somewhere in between the two following happenings: early, organised/compartmentalised, drinking water, eating breakfast, perhaps exercise, maybe meditation; or, hitting the snooze button, oversleeping, rushing around, drinking anything as long as it has the maximum amount of caffeine in it, with promises of breakfast as you run out of the house.

King David’s morning routine is simple.

He wakes up and he talks to God.

How do you think your life would be different if the first person you spoke to when you awoke was God?

Make your requests.

Tell God what you hope the day will bring. Share your worries and concerns. Remember others.

The Bible app YouVersion allows you to set up a ‘verse of the day’ message to come through to your mobile at a specific time. So, alarm sounds, you grab your phone, switch it off, a verse from the Bible is there waiting for you.

Talk to God. Listen to his Word as you make your morning coffee/tea. Pray.

Try it even for a week and see what a difference it makes.